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Art Scene – Cindy Scott Artistry

Having a wedding photographer is a must, even today when everything is digital. A wedding video is also nice, although the bride’s memory of the event might just be more magical without the reminder that her hair wasn’t perfect by hour five. There are also drones, GoPros, and photo booths. But, the most imaginative way to capture the wedding of your dreams is to have the affair painted. Hiring a live-painting artist for your nuptials is the newest, hippest way to make sure the ambiance of the event lives on forever!

The Grand Hall

Live painting (or even by livestream) is an iteration of “plein air” painting, used to commemorate a wedding with a unique, artistic flair. If done in person, the artist shows up with canvas, paints, and art supplies, and the actual session of creating the painting becomes a bit of an event within an event. Guests enjoy watching the piece take shape and watching an artist at work in such an unusual setting. The happy couple then end up with a keepsake piece of art that is completely different from anything else that might document the occasion.

Cindy Scott, of Cindy Scott Artistry, called it, “The story of your celebration told on canvas.” Cindy gets to see all of the emotional toasts, the happy families, the wedding cake, and the traditions of celebrating a marriage. She then combines all of those visual and emotional cues into a painting that is like no other.

Artist Cindy Scott (Photo Credit: KatFour Photo)

What are the particulars behind the creation of the painting? Well, Cindy arrives about two hours before the guests, and she sets up and starts scanning the venue (usually the reception) for architectural elements, layout, lighting, colors, etc. She then selects her palette, and starts creating the foundation of the painting. As the bride and groom move through their night, she captures facial expressions, glances, smiles, and then incorporates them into her work. By the end of the evening, her piece will be on display (safely!) and it is ready for the family to pack up and take home. For one of her wedding consultations, she was asked to do two canvases – one of the ceremony and one of the reception. Done!

Cindy has been honing her artistic skills since childhood – her mother was a “master crafter” and interior decorator, and her dad built furniture and musical instruments. The artist is honored and humbled to be able to create such intimate works of art for her clients. What she really enjoys in addition to the painting is the pre-celebration clamor. Staff are setting up tables, bands are doing sound checks, and there are lots of conversations everywhere that soon dissolve into the quiet elegance before the couple and their guests arrive. “There is a rhythm to each event, which corresponds to my rhythm in creating their art.” Cindy is the grateful recipient of more than what she feels she gives. At one wedding, she met the grandfather of the groom, who proceeded to dance with his bride of 65 years. Admiring Cindy’s painting, he handed her a card from his wallet. On the card was a quote from Ecclesiastes 3:1-11, titled, Take Time. “Take time to think, it is the source of power. Take time to read, it is the foundation of wisdom. Take time to play, it is the secret of staying young. Take time to be quiet, it is the opportunity to seek God. Take time to be aware, it is the opportunity to help others. Take time to love and be loved, it is God’s greatest gift. Take time to laugh, it is the music of the soul. Take time to be friendly, it is the road to happiness. Take time to dream, it is what the future is made of. Take time to pray, it is the greatest power on earth. There is a time for everything.”

Stephens College
Hawthorne House

Applying this wisdom to the recent pandemic and year-plus of not being able to have weddings and loved ones in our midst, Cindy was touched by the relevance of the old words and by the relevance of a committed couple of 65 years still being able to cope with the challenges of today and to embrace the future of their next generation. “Witnessing that family bond at celebrations is everything… I am so lucky to do what I love to do.”

Practical Hints:

  • From general questions about pricing and setup to the style of live painting and the exact moment you want to be documented (such as the first dance or walking up the aisle), there’s no shortage of details you’ll want to flesh out beforehand. For example, is it important for a couple to have their completed painting in-hand by the end of the night? Or, are they all right with allowing the artist to take it home for additional touch-ups?
  • Be sure to include the wedding planner in the early stages, so he/she will be able to step in and serve as a point of contact on the day of the event. From making sure that the painter has a place to access water for paintbrushes to providing the artist with a vendor meal, your wedding planner will be there to keep everything moving.
Windmill Winery Barn

 Also featured in the July 10, 2021 issue of The Independent
By Anne Potter Russ

 

Anne Potter Russ

Anne is thrilled to be working with The Independent again, and even happier to be with some great people. Having served as editor from 2005 to 2009, it is a pleasure to be able to connect with the readers of this timeless magazine. Anne and her husband, Norbert, live in south Leawood, and have two grown kids, Diana and Nick, as well as two rambunctious dogs.

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